Amara West project blog

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Investigating life in an Egyptian town

Amara West 2016: season 9 begins

Neal Spencer, Keeper of Ancient Egypt and Sudan, British Museum

Arrival at Amara West – walking up to the ancient town – for the first time since early March 2015

Arrival at Amara West – walking up to the ancient town – for the first time since early March 2015

After a first season of mapping and survey in early 2008, the fieldwork at Amara West has followed a certain rhythm: methodical excavation of houses and investigation of two cemeteries, alongside the painstaking study of ceramics and objects, and sampling for scientific dating or analyses. This season, our ninth, will be very different. Our sprawling dig house feels very different with 8 rather than 31 team members!

Excavations will focus on three major pyramid tombs in the cemetery. The superstructures were excavated and recorded last year, as were the deep shafts cut through the bedrock. After 10 anxious, long, months, we are back and ready to excavate the burial chambers, led by Michaela Binder. More on that soon.

Fouad Ali Gindi – a veteran excavator of houses at Amara West – commences cleaning of surfaces in house D11.1 in the western suburb

Fouad Ali Gindi – one of our veteran excavators of houses at Amara West – commences cleaning of surfaces in house D11.1 in the western suburb

The ancient town – typically a bustle of activity, with dozens of excavators and workmen, creating rising clouds of dust as the excavated material is sieved for bone, pottery and other objects – is very quiet. Manuela Lehmann will finish excavation of the front of house D11.1, focusing initially on a suite of rooms added to the front of the building, while I will be recording the architecture of additional houses in this extramural sprawl.

This reduction in excavation activity comes as good news to those back at the dig house. Anna Garnett – assisted by Valentina Gasperini – hopes to make inroads into the vast amounts of ceramics collected over the last seven seasons, to shed light on what the buildings and rooms were used for, aspects of ancient technology and also the presence (or absence) of Nubian and imported pottery in different parts of the site. That this can be done without daily arrivals of more ceramics is much appreciated!

There will be more schools and community outreach, coordinated by Tomomi Fushiya, and in February Johannes Auenmüller will join us to study metal objects from area E13.

Alongside regular updates on the blog, follow the season on Twitter: @NealSpencer_BM and #amarawest. More images from the season can be found on Instagram: nealspencer_bm

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Filed under: Amara West 2016, archaeology, funerary, New Kingdom, settlement, survey

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