Amara West project blog

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Investigating life in an Egyptian town

Amara West 2015: books by boat, cart and car


Tomomi Fushiya, archaeologist

Amara West Arabic edition

Towards the end of last year, we published Amara West: Living in Egyptian Nubia, made possible through the Qatar-Sudan Archaeological Project. Published in English and Arabic editions, the Arabic one printed with the communities living in and around Amara West in mind.

Abd el-Razeq, veteran excavator at Amara West.

Abd el-Razeq, veteran excavator at Amara West.

Over the last weeks, we have been distributing the book amongst our workmen. Abdelraziq, who has worked with our mission from the first season in 2008, commented “the book is very useful and I benefit from it so much. If from the first or second season they publish(ed) a book and gave it to the workers and to the community here, all of the community would be informed and know about the (local) history… I worked here from 6 years ago but I knew nothing about why they collect bones and pottery… … I know (now) they put them together and test bones to understand diseases, their date ….’.

Tomomi delivering books to Abri secondary school

Tomomi delivering books to Abri secondary school

We also gave the books to villagers around our dig house, to the local school library and teachers in Ernetta and Abri. In the school curriculum, the major archaeological sites such as Kerma, Jebel Barkal and Meroe are studied. This foregrounds a national, rather than local, history, despite the presence of such famous sites (to archaeologists!) as Sai, Sedeinga and Amara West.

Reading the book en route from Amara West to Ernetta

Reading the book en route from Amara West to Ernetta

The book – distributed by hand, boat, donkey cart and pick-up truck – has been well received so far, and represents our small contribution to communicating archaeological knowledge to the local communities who do not have easy access to museums or libaries.

Women reading the book on the mastaba outside their house on Ernetta island

Women reading the book on the mastaba outside their house on Ernetta island

Alongside regular updates on the blog, follow the season on Twitter: @NealSpencer_BM and #amarawest

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Filed under: Amara West 2015, community engagement, Modern Amara

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